The Bloodiest Year 1972: British Soldiers in Northern Ireland, in their Own Words


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Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. In The Bloodiest Year , Ken Wharton, a former soldier who did two tours of Northern Ireland, tells the story of the worst year of the Troubles through the accounts of the men who patrolled the streets of Belfast and Londonderry, who saw their comrades die and walked with death themselves.

He examines almost every single death during that year, and names the men behind the violence, many of whom now hold high office in the country they tried to so hard to break apart. Get A Copy. Hardcover , pages. More Details Other Editions 3. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Bloodiest Year , please sign up. Lists with This Book.

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Saville report on Bloody Sunday massacre exonerates victims

Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 4. Rating details. The desire for an autonomous Ireland took on even more intensity and violence. Within this context, British politicians recognized that a resolution to problems in Ireland was paramount. The formation of the Home Rule League in acted as a further catalyst for Prime Minister William Gladstone to put forward bills for Irish self-government. Gladstone never got to see his wish for Home Rule come to light — both his and bills were never passed.

But the turn of the century ushered in an age in which Ireland was firmly on the British political agenda. The beginning of the twentieth century saw a cultural renaissance in Ireland. Groups sprung up throughout Ireland, which aimed to preserve native Irish pastimes and language, such as the Gaelic Athletic Association and the Gaelic League. Not all favoured an independent Ireland, however. Home Rule met opposition both from within Parliament and outside of it.


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The Protestant population of Ulster were particularly keen to remain part of the British Empire. As tensions mounted, private armies of , plus men arose to represent the interests of both sides. As it became evident that it was no longer a matter of if but when for Home Rule, tensions mounted and the unionists pressed the importance of an exclusion for Ulster. The Easter Rising of did indeed catch the British off guard.

Nevertheless, the rebellion was swiftly crushed and the key figures rounded up. Britain had won the battle. But they had not won the war — the subsequent brutal execution of the key figures turned these men into martyrs and the cause gained further momentum. The Easter Rising was especially fortuitous for Sinn Fein, whose popularity surged. With the election of Eamon de Valera, one of the surviving leaders of the uprising, to the Presidency of Sinn Fein, all groups working towards an independent Ireland were unified under a single leadership.

The end of World War I did not bring an end to problems for Britain, with issues remaining tense across the shore.

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Violent confrontations quickly broke out, with atrocities committed on both sides. The escalation of violence made an Irish solution urgent. And thus Northern Ireland was born. Calm prevailed for several decades in Northern Ireland, owed in large part to the rule of Prime Minister Viscount Brookeborough, who was in office for 20 years.

His political allegiance with the Ulster Unionists marginalised the Catholic minority both socially and politically. With the advent of better education as a result of the introduction of the Welfare State and the equal opportunities it entailed, the disparities within the Northern Ireland community were highlighted.

This situation was exacerbated in the s: Northern Ireland, which had been relatively prosperous in the immediate years after the war, now suffered the same economic fate as the mainland, which was in economic decline. Brookeborough fell from power; his inability to deal with the situation causing the members of his own party to turn against him.

His new attitude raised hopes for Catholics, but was a cause of concern for Protestants. The Longest Kill. Craig Harrison. Japan's Gestapo. Picking Up The Brass. Eddy Nugent. Operation Mayhem. Steve Heaney. Frontline: A Soldier's Story. Steve Stone. Maverick One. David Blakeley.

The IRA: From conflict to ceasefire

Trigger Time. Mick Flynn. Eddy Nugent and the Map of Africa. Top Dog: Sometimes its not the law you have to worry about. Dougie Brimson.

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Bullet Magnet. Sweating the Metal.

Alex Duncan. Warcrimes of the Waffen-SS. Rudolf Schlossberg. Acceptable Loss.

Shot in the back

Kregg P. Born Fearless.


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    The Bloodiest Year 1972: British Soldiers in Northern Ireland, in their Own Words The Bloodiest Year 1972: British Soldiers in Northern Ireland, in their Own Words
    The Bloodiest Year 1972: British Soldiers in Northern Ireland, in their Own Words The Bloodiest Year 1972: British Soldiers in Northern Ireland, in their Own Words
    The Bloodiest Year 1972: British Soldiers in Northern Ireland, in their Own Words The Bloodiest Year 1972: British Soldiers in Northern Ireland, in their Own Words
    The Bloodiest Year 1972: British Soldiers in Northern Ireland, in their Own Words The Bloodiest Year 1972: British Soldiers in Northern Ireland, in their Own Words
    The Bloodiest Year 1972: British Soldiers in Northern Ireland, in their Own Words The Bloodiest Year 1972: British Soldiers in Northern Ireland, in their Own Words
    The Bloodiest Year 1972: British Soldiers in Northern Ireland, in their Own Words The Bloodiest Year 1972: British Soldiers in Northern Ireland, in their Own Words

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